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organic spices

MADE: Recent Partners

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MADE: Recent Partners

Recently we have been featuring our small business clients over at the Spicely.com blog. We've had the pleasure to introduce grain-free food businesses, juicing parlors, and vegan restaurants, just to name a few. You can read about them here:

Are you a business that uses Spicely or OSI ingredients, and would like to be featured? Please contact us and our Business Development member will contact you shortly.

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What are Oleoresins?

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What are Oleoresins?

Oleoresins are a naturally occurring combination of oil and resin that can be extracted from plants. They are a highly concentrated substance that exists in liquid form.

The extraction process begins with raw spices that are cleaned and ground, then the spices' oils are distilled using an organic solvent.
Different plants require different methods of extraction; common ways to extract are through water (steam distillation), oil, and alcohol, and each can vary in the level of concentration they produce. The content can be controlled and fine tuned through the use of various solvents and pressures. 

For final use, these products are typically dispersed in a dry neutral carrier or liquid such as vegetable oil to the desired strength. They have many applications:

  • As a coloring agent in butter, cheese, meats, snack foods, and cereals
  • In jellies, jams, and gelatin preparations
  • In poultry feed to enhance the color of eggs and poultry
  • In frozen foods, desserts, soups, fish preserved in oil, meat sauces, or any prepared food where a more vibrant color is desired
  • In the preparation of some medicines
  • In soaps, candle making, and hair lotions

Because they have the same properties as the original spice, they can replace whole or ground spices without compromising aroma, flavor, or texture.
As a result, oleoresins have a lot of advantages over whole or ground spices. Oleoresins are easy to store and transport because concentrated forms reduce space and bulk. They can be more heat stable than raw spices and have a longer shelf life due to lower moisture content.

Radiation, synthetic chemicals, and high heat destroy precious plant properties. Distinguishing various methods of extraction for each particular plant and working in small batches ensures product freshness. Our oleoresins are free from contamination and standardized so you are assured of consistent concentration and flavor.

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Asafoetida: What's The Buzz?

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Asafoetida: What's The Buzz?

Asafoetida, or hing, is a spice that can be alarming to the uninitiated - strong, brash, and potent, it's not for the weak palate. Used mostly in central Asian cuisine, western nicknames for this spice are devil's dung and stinking gum. In fact, the name Asafoetida is derived from the word "fetid" - or, "smelling extremely unpleasant".

While odorous right out of the container, asafoetida tempers beautifully when cooked. Traditionally, a small amount is sauteed with hot ghee or oil, and then the oil is used to cook curries. Asafoetida is a popular substitute for onion and garlic in Eastern buddhist cuisine, and the flavor is reminiscent of leeks.

Asafoetida is harvested gum from the Ferula plant, and is usually "cut" with flour so that it can be easily used in culinary applications. Our organic asafoetida product is cut with ground fenugreek, so it's gluten-free and anyone can enjoy it! 

 

Inquire about our organic, gluten-free asafoetida.

 

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New Products from OSI!

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New Products from OSI!

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What Are Anti-Caking Agents?

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What Are Anti-Caking Agents?

 Anti-caking agents are a type of food additive. Most famously depicted through Morton Salt’s “When It Rains It Pours” Campaigns that began as early as 1914, anti-caking agents were developed to keep ingredients from clumping together after being packaged.

Since most product caking comes from moisture, anti-caking agents either act to absorb moisture or act as a sealant and repel water and oil. Like most other food additives and preservatives, the majority come from sources that are hard for human bodies to break down over time. There are some natural ways to keep moisture out of your products as well, like introducing grains such as rice that will absorb moisture.

Here are a list of common anti-caking agents:

● Sodium aluminosilicate - a man-made product

● Sodium ferrocyanide

● Potassium ferrocyanide

● Calcium carbonate

● Magnesium carbonate

● Calcium silicate

● Silicon dioxide - the principle constituent of sandstone

● Hydrophobic silica

● Calcium phosphate/tri-calcium phosphate - bone ash

These are all industry standard ingredients and by law, companies are not required to include them in their labeling.

There are several reasons why OSI refuses to add food additives like anti-caking agents, the main concern being integrity of product. Adding any ingredients to our spices would compromise the flavor, quality and our commitment to product sourcing. The addition of anti-caking agents to powdered organic herbs and spices means you’re not getting a 100% pure product.

OSI is 100% Certified Organic. That means no fillers, no additives, no dyes, no fragrance enhancers, and no anti-caking agents. OSI follows strict organic principles and routinely exceed the most demanding legal and ethical expectations.

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